Category: InVerse Medicine

Repost: @upreetdhaliwal talks about how to beat stress at @NNP_W_Light’s Stress Busting Book Festival – meet books & win Amazon Gift Cards

These are unbelievably stressful days
and they are turning into weeks and months of stress.

Here’s a chance to escape temporarily inside the the covers of diverse books.
The Festival is running all of May – not only do you get to meet 29 featured books, you also stand to win one [or several] amazon gift cards.

Plus, you get to watch your stress disappear.

I’m thrilled to be a part of this event.

My book, InVerse Medicine, has been featured there.

Visit the page to read about how I combat stress. You won’t want to miss it.

Book Cover

Bookmark this festival and tell your friends:

https://www.nnlightsbookheaven.com/stress-busting-book-festival


Visit everyday to learn about the book of the day

and remember to take part in the MASSIVE Giveaway

a Rafflecopter giveaway

It’s open for everyone internationally

Runs May 1 – May 31

Drawing will be held on June 1


Be there everyday

https://www.nnlightsbookheaven.com/stress-busting-book-festival

Why I wrote InVerse Medicine

It doesn’t matter if you’ve never been sick, or if you’re not in the health professions, or if you’ve never had to care for family members or friends with health concerns

All that matters is that you enjoy poetry.

Preface

I wrote a poem about the birth and of the passing away of my baby girl before I knew anything about the potential role for the humanities in medicine. I revisited that poem many times over the years and was moved each time by a sense of wonder and grief and gratitude and remembrance. Perhaps my emotions had something to do with the fact that the poem rep-resented a personal story; but then, I began to notice how other people’s experiences, couched in words that rhymed – or didn’t rhyme – had the same influence on me.

The Health Humanities Group (HHG) at the University College of Medical Sciences, University of Delhi, of which I am a founding member, decided to take this powerful medium to our medical students. We met over many lunch-breaks and the group kept getting larger and larger. Called ‘Parwaaz’ – which means ‘to fly’ – the group brought together students and faculty who wrote exquisite and nuanced poetry, as well as some who did not write, but enjoyed listening to it. Parwaaz gave us first–hand experience of how a poetry collective could be used to stimulate change in attitudes and behavior towards self and towards others.

There are many reports of provider cynicism, of detachment, waning empathy, and burnout; it is evident that the provider-patient relationship is fractured and conventional methods are inadequate in addressing the problem. Poetry reading, as also the writing of it, have been found to promote patient-centered care and empathy. Its use in medical education allows learners to examine emotions and feelings – this might bridge the gap between the theoretical teaching of empathy and actually learning through experiencing it.

Based on the evidence and on my own experience, it seemed worthwhile to compile a collection of poetry that was about illness and health. I applied to The Institute for Medical Humanities (IMH), at UTMB, Galveston, Texas, with the purpose of taking this idea forward. This book took shape during my four months at IMH (now called Institute for Bioethics & Health Humanities) as a Visiting Scholar in 2019 and is thanks to the support I received while I was there.

InVerse Medicine : or : using poetry to enhance communication, empathy, & patient-centered care

I’m so happy that my book is ready to share with the world. I’ve compiled all the health-care-related poems I’ve ever written and they are now available in one volume.

The poems cover all sorts of issues around the provider-patient relationship – like end of life, autonomy, surrogate decision-making, suicide, cancer, dementia, caregiving, communication, empathy, diversity, disability, patient-centered care and so on.

Here’s the cover…

…and, here’s the blurb:

The poems contained in this volume are conversations we could easily overlook in our rush to provide care.

Through poetry, I explore what it really means to be sick, and what it means to be a provider, or a caregiver.

These poems are for people who have ever been unwell, and for those who have never been sick; for people who love poetry, and for those who wonder and doubt; for people who think the healthcare system is fatally flawed, and for those who serve in the system with dedication and love.

The book is for learners of the healthcare professions, just as much as it is for teachers and practitioners.

These poems are for you…


If you’d prefer a Print Version, check out these vendors:


Thank you for visiting this page.

Have you experienced any of the issues portrayed in the poems?

Don’t forget to let me know if any of the poems resonated with you.

Also, do consider leaving a review at any one of your favorite vendors (Goodreads also, if you can). It’ll be deeply appreciated.